Don’t Let the Robots Take Over The World


future-cars.jpg.662x0_q70_crop-scale There’s been a lot of talk lately about driverless cars. We know that Google has been working on it, we know that Apple’s been working on it.I say let’s stop working on this stupid concept, sure everybody says you can’t stop progress that you, need to keep on innovating when it comes to technology but this is something that will literally destroy the working class of the world.

Now, I might sound a little bit like Bernie Sanders  but the reality is that Taxi,Uber,truck and courier drivers will lose their jobs.Today, as their always has been, there are a lot of people who drive for a living  and by taking this away from them we are literally going to plunge the world into a state of unemployment.

I have read  articles by Futurist writers who predict that by 2030 it will be illegal to drive a vehicle because,  as we all know,driving is a dangerous thing, infact, it could be argued that the easiest way to get killed is driving a vehicle.

Certainly I hope this day never comes because I just absolutely love driving and have loved driving ever since I got behind the wheel .Now when it comes to driving I also wonder why are people in such a hurry to simply get in the car like a drone and let the car driveway why what you want to do that do that don’t you just want to enjoy driving three this seems like basically taking the train now I can see how becoming handy if you have been out and had a few drinks and the car can drive you home then maybe it might be a great thing for the entertainment business .

Recently I posed the question of self driving cars on social media and some of the comments were quite interesting. It seems I’m not the only one with grave concerns including this one from Peter in Yorkshire who writes…“Ok, picture this: you’re travelling on a country road and an animal jumps out in front of you (while) a vehicle is travelling in  the opposite direction,” he wrote.“What action would an automated car make and what action would a human make? Would an automated vehicle veer into the oncoming vehicle OR ditch the vehicle off the shoulder of the road?”

Peter’s question illustrates the major dilemma facing developers of self-driving cars, which in turn prompted a paper by researchers at the Toulouse School of Economics on the ‘experimental ethics’ required before these vehicles can be released to the public.They surveyed several hundred people online and posed a number of scenarios – including one similar to the above where a car can either run into a group of people or swerve into a wall, badly injuring or killing the occupant

“On a scale from -50 (protect the driver at all costs) to +50 (maximize the number of lives saved), the average response was +24,” the researchers wrote.”Results suggest that participants were generally comfortable with utilitarian AVs, programmed to minimize an accident’s death toll.”

However, the responses changed in reaction to where the respondents metaphorically stood in the scenarios (in the car or on the street) along with the age of potential victims.The researchers further hypothesised on whether a driverless car’s decision-making would be legislated or if purchasers  could choose from different ‘levels’ of morality,thus raising the question of the owner’s level of responsibility for the car’s actions.

Another issue is the reliability of the technology that keeps self-driving cars on the road.“(What if) the idiots figure out what they have to do to make your car flinch then go around playing chicken with other peoples’ car because they know they can get away with it because the car is smart enough to miss them?” Tim of the Northern Beaches asked.

But researchers are generally agreed that roads dominated by self-driving cars would be safer than present and crashes would be less likely than if humans were driving once the technology had been developed to a reliable level.This leaves us with the question of human motivation –WHY? And what about the people and employment factor. Surely this has to considered by government before letting these things on the road.  Don’t let the robots take over.

Cocktail Nation Evenings At The Penthouse-A Slow Cocktail

If you are feeling stressed and need some time out from the modern world then join Koop Kooper for an intimate party for two up high in the Sydney Penthouse. The drinks and finger food are ready to go so pull up a chair on the balcony and watch the world go by with some cocktail jazz.

http://www.cocktailnation.podbean.com

Cocktail Inn-Days Of Wine And Roses
Combustible Edison -Lonelyville
Frank Sinatra-Like Someone in Love
Gene Rains-Tiki
George Shearing -I’ll Remember April
Henry Mancini-The Summer Know
Jackie Gleason-Mystery Street
Janet Seidel-A Man and A Woman
Nat King Cole George Shearing -A Beautiful Friendship
Nathan Haines-Cocktails
Tiki Lounge Crew-Upscale Cocktail

 

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Cocktail Nation 400 Femme Fatales

This week talking about those naughty girls of film, the gorgeous gals of film noir b grade world, you know the type, a whole lot of va va voom and knife in the other hand, I’m talking abou the femme fatales of film.
We talk classic cars and playboy MCM furniture for the bachelor pad

http://www.cocktailnation.podbean.com
Tikiyaki Orchestra -Malaga Cove
Professor Cunningham -It Ain’t Necessarily So
Chaino -Voodoo
Project Pimento-Brazil
Perry Beekman-But Not For Me
Les Baxter -Shooting Star
Skip Heller-Mona Is Typing
Kenny Sasaki -Fly Me To The Island
Provocateur-My Eyes Danced
Pink Martini-But Now I’m Back
Royal Crown Revue-Deadly Nightcall
Roland Remington Babalu
Clouseaux -Reum With A View

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EU backs down over threat to classic cars

  
The European Commission has backed down over plans which would have seen owners of classic cars being forced to take them off the road if they had been modified in any way.
Stephen Hammond, the roads minister, secured the deal in Brussels after hearing representations from car enthusiasts.

  
The Commission had drawn up plans for a “roadworthiness test” directive which would have required all components on a car to conform with those on the vehicle when it was first registered.
According to the EU document the move was justified because “Vehicles of historic interest are supposed to conserve heritage of the époque they have been built”
But it was feared this would create havoc, especially given the number of carmakers who have disappeared over the last 50 years.
This would have hit owners of classic marques, such as Triumph, Wolseley and Sunbeam, which have long since disappeared – making spare parts almost impossible to find as a result.
The agreement means that UK testers will be given greater discretion to assess the roadworthiness of classic cars built after 1960. Historic vehicles built before that date are exempt from the MoT.
Mr Hammond has also persuaded the Commission to drop the requirement for more than one million caravans and trailers to undergo an MoT.
Had the EU pressed ahead with the original proposals it was feared this would cost Britain over £1 billion over five years. The modified version is likely to cost only £18 million.

  

Playboy-Themed Architecture Exhibit Celebrates the Art of the Bachelor Pad

   

An upcoming exhibit at the Elmhurst Art Museum titled ‘Playboy Architecture, 1953-1979’ will represent somewhat of a spiritual return for the famed men’s lifestyle brand after being founded in the Windy City in 1953. Though Playboy is best known for its provocative centerfold models, the exhibit will explore the magazine’s role in setting the aesthetic tone of post-war America.
Early on Playboy recognized the changing styles of the 20th century and ran features on architectural heavyweights such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Buckminster Fuller, and Mies van der Rohe. Cutting-edge design was paramount in establishing the look and feel of the Playboy brand and, in turn, the publication’s idealization of the modern bachelor pad became synonymous with cool, influencing generations to follow.

An upcoming exhibit at the Elmhurst Art Museum titled ‘Playboy Architecture, 1953-1979’ will represent somewhat of a spiritual return for the famed men’s lifestyle brand after being founded in the Windy City in 1953. Though Playboy is best known for its provocative centerfold models, the exhibit will explore the magazine’s role in setting the aesthetic tone of post-war America.
Early on Playboy recognized the changing styles of the 20th century and ran features on architectural heavyweights such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Buckminster Fuller, and Mies van der Rohe. Cutting-edge design was paramount in establishing the look and feel of the Playboy brand and, in turn, the publication’s idealization of the modern bachelor pad became synonymous with cool, influencing generations to follow.

  

The ‘Playboy Architecture, 1953-1979’ exhibit will be divided into thematic sections exploring the magazine’s influence on interior decor, urban design, transportation, and music. In additional to drawings, photos, and scale models of Playboy-inspired architecture, the museum’s Mies van der Rohe-designed McCormick House will be staged with iconic midcentury modern furnishings as it is reimagined as the ultimate retro swingers pad.

  
The exhibition will be making its US debut at the Elmhurst Art Museum after a previous stint at the Bureau Europa gallery of architecture and design in the Netherlands. It will run between May 7 and August 28.

  
http://chicago.curbed.com/2016/4/8/11393902/chicago-architecture-playboy-exhibit